Internet dating journal articles

But in this social strategy, how do we know that anyone is who they claim to be?And more importantly, could we spot a catfish if one swam into our network?

internet dating journal articles-62

Casting a hook The term catfish was made popular by the 2010 documentary film by the same name (which has also morphed into a series on MTV).

It refers to a person who is intentionally deceptive when creating a social media profile, often with the goal of making a romantic connection.

Additionally, 42% of Americans know someone who has used an online dating site or app, an increase of 11% from 2005, and 29% of Americans know someone who has met their partner through this medium, compared with 15% who made this claim in 2005.

This data represents a significant shift in the perception of online dating, suggesting that the stigma associated with the practice is dropping: While some of us may Friend more discriminately than others, we live in a time where it's common to build online networks that include secondary and tertiary connections.

Women are especially likely to enlist a friend in helping them craft the perfect profile—30% of female online daters have done this, compared with 16% of men.

5% of Americans who are in a marriage or committed relationship say they met their significant other online.

Nev connected with Abby, and subsequently her family, over email, phone, and eventually Facebook.

His relationship with Megan grew until discrepancies in the information she shared were revealed.

This deception can be elaborate, and may involve the use of fake photos, fake biographies, and sometimes fictitious supporting networks as well.

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